About Joe

Joe Fryer officially joined NBC News as a Los Angeles-based correspondent in October 2013. Prior to that, he spent a couple months filling in for NBC, producing reports for Nightly News, the Today Show, MSNBC and NBCNews.com. While working for the network, Joe has covered a deadline landslide in Washington state, the UC-Santa Barbara shooting spree, destructive wildfires near San Diego, deadly floods in Colorado, Hannah Anderson’s kidnapping and San Diego Mayor Bob Filner’s resignation.

Before joining NBC, Joe spent three years as a special projects reporter at KING 5 News in Seattle, where he covered some of the Northwest’s most important stories: the Amanda Knox verdict, the historic vote approving same-sex marriage and the Skagit River Bridge collapse. Joe traveled to Colorado to examine that state’s well-regulated medical marijuana industry. He also visited both Boston and San Francisco to see what Washington can learn from other cities that removed double-decker driving structures along their waterfronts.

In 2014, Joe was honored with four Regional Emmy awards, including the Emmys for News Writing and General Assignment Reporter. “Miles of Thread,” a feature story about women in Washington who made quilts for the victims of the Newtown school shooting, was honored with an Emmy for Serious Feature.

In 2013, Joe won his second consecutive National Headliner Award for Feature Reporting. He was honored for “Ali’s Guiding Lights,” a story about extraordinary high school students who found a creative way to help their blind classmate achieve a seemingly impossible dream: driving a car. That story also earned the prestigious Sigma Delta Chi Award for Feature Reporting given by the Society of Professional Journalists, along with a Regional Emmy.

In 2012, Joe won the National Headliner Award for “A Family’s Courage,” an in-depth story on the bond between a photographer and a family that lost their newborn baby. That story also received a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award and Regional Emmy for Feature Reporting.

Joe came to the Northwest from Minnesota, which is his home state.  He spent six years at KARE-TV, the NBC affiliate in Minneapolis, and was the first reporter from his station on the scene of the 35W Bridge collapse in 2007.  Joe also flew to Phoenix to cover the death of Minnesota Twins legend Kirby Puckett and took a couple trips to Washington, DC, so he could produce a documentary on a Minnesota soldier who lost his legs in Iraq.  Perhaps Joe’s most memorable story was the tale of Nicklas Nelson, a brave 9-year-old boy who was born with webbed legs.  Nick asked doctors to amputate his legs so he could learn to walk with prosthetics.

Before moving to Minnesota, Joe worked at WTVF-TV in Nashville, Tenn., WBAY-TV in Green Bay, Wis. and WKYT-TV in Lexington, Ky.  He’s a proud graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.

In all, Joe has received four national Edward R. Murrow Awards, including the prestigious Writing Murrow in 2006.  His awards shelf also includes 11 Regional Murrows, 19 Regional Emmys (with 61 nominations), two National Headliner Awards and one Sigma Delta Chi Award.  His reporting and writing have been recognized by the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA), National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association, The Associated Press and Association of Health Care Journalists.

Joe is on the faculty of the NPPA’s Advanced Storytelling Workshop in San Marcos, Texas.  He recently served on the Board of Governors for NATAS Northwest, the regional Emmy chapter based in Seattle.

3 thoughts on “About Joe

  1. Really enjoyed watching your top 12 of 2012! You are a fantastic storyteller …. creative, compassionate, and dedicated to making our craft shine. I’m proud to have worked with you and wish you the best in 2013.. Steve Hayslip WTVF Nashville

  2. Hi Joe, I saw you on NBC news tonite and googled you. My name is Gary Fryer and that is an uncommon last name. I was just wandering about your family history. Mine arrived in Arkansas in the 1840s via Alabama from No. Carolina where we arrived from England in the late 18th century or early 19th. Sorry to bore you but was just interested in the possible connection!

    Congratulations for your assignment to the network this month!

    Gary Fryer

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